She's a master of body language and style

Jan Hargrave opens the door to her Galleria townhome looking like she walked off the pages of a French fashion magazine. She's clad in a simple Alaïa black top and slim pants, a pair of black Alexandre Birman booties, a multistrand pearl necklace and her signature pink eyeglasses. Her hair is a perfect pixie. Hargrave laughs as if to say, "this old thing?" about her outfit. Visitors should expect nothing less from the Louisiana native with French Cajun roots. In her pink-accented office, Chanel table books are stacked on the coffee table, Chanel accessories abound, and a mannequin Hargrave calls "CoCo," after the famed designer, stands guard. Hargrave is one of a kind when it comes to her style. She's also one of a dozen acclaimed body-language experts in the nation. More

Jan Hargrave opens the door to her Galleria townhome looking like she walked off the pages of a French fashion magazine.

She's clad in a simple Alaïa black top and slim pants, a pair of black Alexandre Birman booties, a multistrand pearl necklace and her signature pink eyeglasses. Her hair is a perfect pixie.

Hargrave laughs as if to say, "this old thing?" about her outfit. Visitors should expect nothing less from the Louisiana native with French Cajun roots.

In her pink-accented office, Chanel table books are stacked on the coffee table, Chanel accessories abound, and a mannequin Hargrave calls "CoCo," after the famed designer, stands guard.

Hargrave is one of a kind when it comes to her style. She's also one of a dozen acclaimed body-language experts in the nation.

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Jason Dirden says it's good to be bad on 'Greenleaf'

Jason Dirden knows what it's like to be hated. For much of his career, the actor and Houston native has played basically good, hardworking and often complex guys trying to find their way. But on OWN's hit drama "Greenleaf," Dirden plays Pastor Basie Skanks, an unscrupulous man of the cloth who is set on doing what he can to unleash a wrath of revenge. He's the character fans love to hate. More  

Jason Dirden knows what it's like to be hated.

For much of his career, the actor and Houston native has played basically good, hardworking and often complex guys trying to find their way. But on OWN's hit drama "Greenleaf," Dirden plays Pastor Basie Skanks, an unscrupulous man of the cloth who is set on doing what he can to unleash a wrath of revenge.

He's the character fans love to hate.

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Ken doll evolves with cornrows, man buns

Ken was in a rut. While Barbie had a makeover last year and emerged with a variety of skin tones and body types, Ken remained pretty much the buff boyfriend with the plastic side part that hit the scene in 1961. Until this week. Mattel unveiled a new Ken doll in 15 different styles - seven skin tones, three body shapes and a variety of hair styles. There's Ken with a man bun, Ken with cornrows, Ken with cool glasses, Ken as a bleach-blonde surfer, Ken with olive skin, and even Ken with a hipster pompadour. He comes in three body shapes: "original" (which basically means buff),"slim," and "broad" (some are calling him dad-bod Ken). More  

Ken was in a rut.

While Barbie had a makeover last year and emerged with a variety of skin tones and body types, Ken remained pretty much the buff boyfriend with the plastic side part that hit the scene in 1961.

Until this week. Mattel unveiled a new Ken doll in 15 different styles - seven skin tones, three body shapes and a variety of hair styles.

There's Ken with a man bun, Ken with cornrows, Ken with cool glasses, Ken as a bleach-blonde surfer, Ken with olive skin, and even Ken with a hipster pompadour.

He comes in three body shapes: "original" (which basically means buff),"slim," and "broad" (some are calling him dad-bod Ken).

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Designer inspired by African roots, travels

It's just been nearly three years since Onyii (pronounced "Own-Yee") Brown launched her African-inspired collection, Onyii & Co., and now she's basking in the national spotlight. She was a 2015 finalist for Martha Stewart's "American Made" contest, which celebrates brands made in the United States. And in September, she'll show her spring/summer 2017 collection at New York Fashion Week, presented by Amconyc. Brown, 39, started her line with $125 and one pale-yellow, maxi wrap skirt on Etsy. Her foray into fashion was hardly the norm. Nigerian born and raised in Amherst, Mass., Brown set out to study robotics engineering at the University of Massachusetts but decided on a degree in marketing. During her junior year, she took an internship in New York's garment district with a fabric converter, a company that turns raw materials such as cotton into textiles for designers. More

It's just been nearly three years since Onyii (pronounced "Own-Yee") Brown launched her African-inspired collection, Onyii & Co., and now she's basking in the national spotlight.

She was a 2015 finalist for Martha Stewart's "American Made" contest, which celebrates brands made in the United States. And in September, she'll show her spring/summer 2017 collection at New York Fashion Week, presented by Amconyc.

Brown, 39, started her line with $125 and one pale-yellow, maxi wrap skirt on Etsy.

Her foray into fashion was hardly the norm. Nigerian born and raised in Amherst, Mass., Brown set out to study robotics engineering at the University of Massachusetts but decided on a degree in marketing. During her junior year, she took an internship in New York's garment district with a fabric converter, a company that turns raw materials such as cotton into textiles for designers.

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Michelle Smith finds creative groove with Milly

Designer Michelle Smith walks the runway at the Milly By Michelle Smith show during Spring 2016 New York Fashion Week at Art Beam on September 15, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images) Michelle Smith's long, blond mane - and the blowouts to straighten it - had been a part of her world since she launched her Milly brand in 2001. But last year, she decided her hair was weighing her down. So after a photo shoot for her latest collection, Smith told celebrity hairstylist Yannick D'Is to "do whatever you want to do to my hair." He chopped off nearly 10 inches and left her with a glamorous cut with natural curl. "I was so ready to go back to my curly hair. It was time. Maybe it was about feeling more confident," said Smith, 43, who recently was in Houston for the Children's Assessment Center annual Spirit of Spring Luncheon and Fashion Show at the Royal Sonesta Hotel. The event featured a Neiman Marcus runway show of her collection. Smith is also feeling more romantic these days. Her spring and summer "Modern Love" collection is a sensual mix of soft details and structured design with off-the-shoulder blouses, flirty and ruffled dresses and cascading skirts in hues from sunrise to sunset. The designs come from a more personal place, she said, taking hearty fabrics such as denim and cotton shirting and making them feminine and playful. More

Designer Michelle Smith walks the runway at the Milly By Michelle Smith show during Spring 2016 New York Fashion Week at Art Beam on September 15, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by JP Yim/Getty Images)

Michelle Smith's long, blond mane - and the blowouts to straighten it - had been a part of her world since she launched her Milly brand in 2001.

But last year, she decided her hair was weighing her down. So after a photo shoot for her latest collection, Smith told celebrity hairstylist Yannick D'Is to "do whatever you want to do to my hair."

He chopped off nearly 10 inches and left her with a glamorous cut with natural curl.

"I was so ready to go back to my curly hair. It was time. Maybe it was about feeling more confident," said Smith, 43, who recently was in Houston for the Children's Assessment Center annual Spirit of Spring Luncheon and Fashion Show at the Royal Sonesta Hotel. The event featured a Neiman Marcus runway show of her collection.

Smith is also feeling more romantic these days. Her spring and summer "Modern Love" collection is a sensual mix of soft details and structured design with off-the-shoulder blouses, flirty and ruffled dresses and cascading skirts in hues from sunrise to sunset. The designs come from a more personal place, she said, taking hearty fabrics such as denim and cotton shirting and making them feminine and playful.

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Stella McCartney breaks the rules of fashion

Designer Stella McCartney, center, and her models pose backstage after the Stella McCartney show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2016. Stella McCartney whips out her cellphone to snap a selfie in front of the Tom Ford store at River Oaks District. She's tickled that she and Ford, a Dallas native and a close friend, have storefronts in the luxury retail development within walking distances of each other. She texts him the photo. "I'm seeing people walk around with my bags, and I love it," says McCartney, who was in Houston last week for the official grand-opening party for her store. "It's funny ... you don't realize how fortunate you are to open a store. There's so much that goes into it. It has to be the right timing, and everything has to line up. This was the time that everything lined up to have our store here." McCartney's first Houston outpost, which had a soft opening in October, is her seventh U.S. store and one of 45 locations worldwide, including London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Milan and Tokyo. McCartney, 44, says her busy home life with husband Alasdhair Willis and their four children - ages 5, 8, 9 and 11 - means she doesn't do many "road shows," but she tries to visit when she can. (One of her favorite things to do with her children, she says, is to "look at them and smell them. I'm obsessed with their breath in the morning, which is terrifying.") Before the Houston visit, McCartney was in Los Angeles and decided to check on things at the store there. "Sometimes I go in (unannounced) and say, 'Hi' and everyone freaks out," she says. It's that unassuming quality - and her unbridled talent as a designer - that McCartney is known for. She's not caught up in celebrity; her dad is a music legend, after all. For her, life in the spotlight comes with much humility. More

Designer Stella McCartney, center, and her models pose backstage after the Stella McCartney show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2016.

Stella McCartney whips out her cellphone to snap a selfie in front of the Tom Ford store at River Oaks District.

She's tickled that she and Ford, a Dallas native and a close friend, have storefronts in the luxury retail development within walking distances of each other. She texts him the photo.

"I'm seeing people walk around with my bags, and I love it," says McCartney, who was in Houston last week for the official grand-opening party for her store. "It's funny ... you don't realize how fortunate you are to open a store. There's so much that goes into it. It has to be the right timing, and everything has to line up. This was the time that everything lined up to have our store here."

McCartney's first Houston outpost, which had a soft opening in October, is her seventh U.S. store and one of 45 locations worldwide, including London, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, Milan and Tokyo.

McCartney, 44, says her busy home life with husband Alasdhair Willis and their four children - ages 5, 8, 9 and 11 - means she doesn't do many "road shows," but she tries to visit when she can. (One of her favorite things to do with her children, she says, is to "look at them and smell them. I'm obsessed with their breath in the morning, which is terrifying.")

Before the Houston visit, McCartney was in Los Angeles and decided to check on things at the store there.

"Sometimes I go in (unannounced) and say, 'Hi' and everyone freaks out," she says.

It's that unassuming quality - and her unbridled talent as a designer - that McCartney is known for. She's not caught up in celebrity; her dad is a music legend, after all. For her, life in the spotlight comes with much humility.

More

Wanderlust: Summer styles take cues from cultures of the world

Xochitl Frazier of Page Parkes Models is wearing a Dolce & Gabbana dress, $1,995, from The Webster; and Devon Leigh earrings, $395, and Nest gold necklaces, $295 each, from Neiman Marcus. Her bangles, $125, are available at inspiredluxe.com. Fashion styling by Joy Sewing. Makeup by Tree Vaello. Photo by Gary Coronado. Fashion absorbs culture, and designers take in influences from across the globe and reinterpret them for their collections. So as summer starts, life unwinds and the weather warms, the luxury-fashion scene reveals a mix of cultural accents - Spanish, Asian, African, Indian - all with bohemian appeal. Houston designer Elaine Turner suggests the global trend is part escapism and part fantasy. Shoppers consumed by wanderlust, or even those who have traveled the world, want to look and feel the part of the adventuress. "The cultural influences we see can take you away and carry you to someplace unique, someplace tropical," she says. More

Xochitl Frazier of Page Parkes Models is wearing a Dolce & Gabbana dress, $1,995, from The Webster; and Devon Leigh earrings, $395, and Nest gold necklaces, $295 each, from Neiman Marcus. Her bangles, $125, are available at inspiredluxe.com. Fashion styling by Joy Sewing. Makeup by Tree Vaello. Photo by Gary Coronado.

Fashion absorbs culture, and designers take in influences from across the globe and reinterpret them for their collections.

So as summer starts, life unwinds and the weather warms, the luxury-fashion scene reveals a mix of cultural accents - Spanish, Asian, African, Indian - all with bohemian appeal.

Houston designer Elaine Turner suggests the global trend is part escapism and part fantasy. Shoppers consumed by wanderlust, or even those who have traveled the world, want to look and feel the part of the adventuress.

"The cultural influences we see can take you away and carry you to someplace unique, someplace tropical," she says.

More