Daughter turns loss into life lessons

Lacey Huckaby was 18 when she met her mother for the first time. It was Mother's Day 2005. Their meeting was more fate than coincidental. Huckaby, who is black and was adopted as an infant by a white family, knew her biological mother's name, Bettie DeBruhl, when she was growing up. But she was told by her adopted family that her biological mother had died. During Huckaby's freshman year in college, she went looking for a clue, some detail about the woman who gave her life. More

Lacey Huckaby was 18 when she met her mother for the first time. It was Mother's Day 2005.

Their meeting was more fate than coincidental.

Huckaby, who is black and was adopted as an infant by a white family, knew her biological mother's name, Bettie DeBruhl, when she was growing up. But she was told by her adopted family that her biological mother had died.

During Huckaby's freshman year in college, she went looking for a clue, some detail about the woman who gave her life.

More

Marianne Williamson spreads message of love

Marianne Williamson was a teen attending Bellaire High School when she discovered a New Age bookstore in Rice Village. It became her sanctum, a refuge of sorts from the world. It also was part of her introduction to Houston's blossoming spiritual community and one of the reasons she calls the city a hotbed for "seekers." "It's not like I had to leave Houston to find any kind of spiritual sustenance," says the New York Times best-selling author, who will release her 13th spiritual self-help book, "Tears to Triumph: The Spiritual Journey From Suffering to Enlightenment" (HarperCollins), in June. "I've been to two therapists in Houston during my adult years who were as formative as any other teachers in my life. So Houston continues to be rich in the area of spiritual pursuit from the Jung Center to some of the people at Rice University, University of Houston and the churches, synagogues and beyond. Houston is deep, rich soil for the seeker, and I'm grateful to be from here." More

Marianne Williamson was a teen attending Bellaire High School when she discovered a New Age bookstore in Rice Village. It became her sanctum, a refuge of sorts from the world.

It also was part of her introduction to Houston's blossoming spiritual community and one of the reasons she calls the city a hotbed for "seekers."

"It's not like I had to leave Houston to find any kind of spiritual sustenance," says the New York Times best-selling author, who will release her 13th spiritual self-help book, "Tears to Triumph: The Spiritual Journey From Suffering to Enlightenment" (HarperCollins), in June.

"I've been to two therapists in Houston during my adult years who were as formative as any other teachers in my life. So Houston continues to be rich in the area of spiritual pursuit from the Jung Center to some of the people at Rice University, University of Houston and the churches, synagogues and beyond. Houston is deep, rich soil for the seeker, and I'm grateful to be from here."

More